Finding a New Community

Most newcomers to Canada settle in its three biggest cities – Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver. However, medium-sized cities often have as much to offer as the larger cities, and many newcomers and Canadians choose smaller communities.

Among the medium-sized cities are Halifax, Québec City, Ottawa, London, Windsor, Sudbury, Winnipeg, Saskatoon, Regina, Calgary, Edmonton and Victoria. All of these cities have diverse, multi-ethnic populations ranging in size from approximately 100,000 to one million people. These cities have the variety of public and private institutions and services found in the largest cities.

You may also like the idea of living in a smaller city or town, like Moncton, Fredericton, Red Deer and Kelowna. Perhaps you would prefer to live in a rural area? Depending on your skills or professional qualifications, some regions may have better job opportunities than others.

Visit the websites for Canada’s provinces and territories to see what each of them has to offer.

Many newcomers choose to move to a province that has an immigrant population from their home country. This allows them to find a community of people with whom they share a common background in their new home.

Below are the top three countries of origin for immigrants to each province and territory between 2001 and 2006.

Immigrants’ country of origin

Province or Territory

Country #1

Country #2

Country #3

British Columbia

China

India

Philippines

Alberta

China

Philippines

India

Saskatchewan

China

United States

United Kingdom

Manitoba

Philippines

India

Germany

Ontario

India

China

Pakistan

Quebec

China

Algeria

France

New Brunswick

United States

China

South Korea

Nova Scotia

United States

China

United Kingdom

Prince Edward Island

United States

United Kingdom

Colombia

Newfoundland and Labrador

United Kingdom

United States

China

Yukon

United States

Philippines

Germany

Northwest Territories

Philippines

Ghana

United States

Nunavut

China

Cuba

India

For more information about other communities and regional immigration trends across Canada, see http://www12.statcan.ca/english/census06/data/highlights/Immigration/Table404.cfm.

Another helpful source of information for newcomers is the Canadian Newcomer Magazine. It provides free advice, entertainment, education and encouragement to new immigrants, and information about community services and programs to help you adjust to your new home and community. See for yourself at http://www.cnmag.ca/index.html.